Essay of poverty in south africa

A recent editorial in one of South Africa’s dailies pointed out that a deeper look at the various political party manifestos revealed similarities among those contesting the elections. “Just how they plan to make these necessary reforms if given a chance, is the detail that appears to be lacking,” it said. Clear and well-crafted strategies that pay careful attention to poverty reduction and the education system in particular would be advised if leaders are to make promises a reality.

Paula Armstrong, Bongisa Lekezwa and Krige Siebrits are based at the University of Stellenbosch Department of Economics and authors of the working paper Poverty in South Africa: A profile based on recent household surveys.

Topic : “Captain of all these Men of Death”: What is required to turn the tide against tuberculosis (TB) in South Africa?
1. *Katrina Lehmann-Grube, Grade 12, Wynberg Girls’ High School, Cape Town Katrina’s Essay
2. Elizabeth Halley-Stott, Grade 10, St Anne’s Diocesan College, Hilton
3. Tshepo Rapitso, Grade 10, Moroka High School, Thabanchu
Merit Prizes :
Yuvna Balgobind, Grade 10, Danville Park Girls’ High School, Durban
Tinuke Eboka, Grade 10, St Anne’s Diocesan College, Hilton

I am the granddaughter of welfare recipients. My parents ascended to the lower middle class and I have climbed higher. When I look at those beneath me in income, I don’t think pull yourselves up by the bootstrap. I think how can I help you up the ladder. What I see above me in income is the tendency for protectionism of wealth and status. A violation of societal norms and a tendency to blame those less fortunate for their laziness. Redistribution is not about punishment or equality. It is about shelter (security), food, health, clean air and water, and education. To do otherwise is wasteful and discards the potential in each human being for the benefit of a few.

In July, the Senate rejected the bonus 62 to 18. Most of the protesters went home, aided by Hoover's offer of free passage on the rails. Ten thousand remained behind, among them a hard core of Communists and other organizers. On the morning of July 28, forty protesters tried to reclaim an evacuated building in downtown Washington scheduled for demolition. The city's police chief, Pellham Glassford, sympathetic to the marchers, was knocked down by a brick. Glassford's assistant suffered a fractured skull. When rushed by a crowd, two other policemen opened fire. Two of the marchers were killed.
Source
Bud Fields and his family. Alabama. 1935 or 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Squatter's Camp, Route 70, Arkansas, October, 1935.
Photographer: Ben Shahn
Source
Philipinos cutting lettuce, Salinas, California, 1935. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
In order to maximize their ability to exploit farm workers, California employers recruited from China, Japan, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Mexico, the American south, and Europe.
Source
Roadside stand near Birmingham, Alabama, 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Farmer and sons, dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936. Photographer: Arthur Rothstein.
The drought that helped cripple agriculture in the Great Depression was the worst in the climatological history of the country. By 1934 it had dessicated the Great Plains, from North Dakota to Texas, from the Mississippi River Valley to the Rockies. Vast dust storms swept the region.
Source
Migrant pea pickers camp in the rain. California, February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
In one of the largest pea camps in California. February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
The photograph that has become known as "Migrant Mother" is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. Lange was concluding a month's trip photographing migratory farm labor around the state for what was then the Resettlement Administration. In 1960, Lange gave this account of the experience:  I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography , Feb. 1960).
Source

Essay of poverty in south africa

essay of poverty in south africa

In July, the Senate rejected the bonus 62 to 18. Most of the protesters went home, aided by Hoover's offer of free passage on the rails. Ten thousand remained behind, among them a hard core of Communists and other organizers. On the morning of July 28, forty protesters tried to reclaim an evacuated building in downtown Washington scheduled for demolition. The city's police chief, Pellham Glassford, sympathetic to the marchers, was knocked down by a brick. Glassford's assistant suffered a fractured skull. When rushed by a crowd, two other policemen opened fire. Two of the marchers were killed.
Source
Bud Fields and his family. Alabama. 1935 or 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Squatter's Camp, Route 70, Arkansas, October, 1935.
Photographer: Ben Shahn
Source
Philipinos cutting lettuce, Salinas, California, 1935. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
In order to maximize their ability to exploit farm workers, California employers recruited from China, Japan, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Mexico, the American south, and Europe.
Source
Roadside stand near Birmingham, Alabama, 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Farmer and sons, dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936. Photographer: Arthur Rothstein.
The drought that helped cripple agriculture in the Great Depression was the worst in the climatological history of the country. By 1934 it had dessicated the Great Plains, from North Dakota to Texas, from the Mississippi River Valley to the Rockies. Vast dust storms swept the region.
Source
Migrant pea pickers camp in the rain. California, February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
In one of the largest pea camps in California. February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
The photograph that has become known as "Migrant Mother" is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. Lange was concluding a month's trip photographing migratory farm labor around the state for what was then the Resettlement Administration. In 1960, Lange gave this account of the experience:  I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography , Feb. 1960).
Source

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